Archive for the 'Updates' Category

CAIDA Resource Catalog

Tuesday, October 27th, 2020 by Bradley Huffaker

One of CAIDA’s primary missions has been to improve our understanding of the Internet infrastructure, through data-driven science. To this end, CAIDA has collected and maintains one of the largest collections of Internet-related data sets in the world, and developed tools and services to curate and process that data. Along with this success has come the challenge of helping new students and researchers to find and use that rich archive of resources.

As part of our NSF-funded DIBBS project, CAIDA has developed a rich context resource catalog, served at catalog.caida.org. The goal of the catalog is to help both newcomers and experienced users with data discovery, and reducing the time between finding the data and extracting knowledge and insights from it.

In addition to linking datasets to related papers and presentations, the catalog will also link to code snippets, user-provided notes, and recipes for performing commons analytical tasks with the data.

The catalog can be found at: https://catalog.caida.org

Please explore and provide feedback!

IPv4 History Visualization

Thursday, August 6th, 2020 by Nicole Lee

This visualization shows how the growing demand for those addresses transformed the governance model from a handful of scientists and engineers managing these addresses to the multi-stakeholder governance model we have today. IPv4 (the fourth version of the Internet Protocol) is the governing standard of today’s Internet. Similar to any other network, unique identifiers play an integral role in Internet routing. We group IP address blocks based on the organization that regulates its allocation as recorded in IANA’s IPv4 address space file and the RFC.

Please view the visualization at: https://www.caida.org/publications/visualizations/ipv4-history/

Screenshots of the visualization

 

 

 

 

 

This was created with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF). For any questions or comments on this project, please contact info@caida.org.

CAIDA’s Annual Report for 2019

Monday, July 6th, 2020 by kc

The CAIDA annual report summarizes CAIDA’s activities for 2019, in the areas of research, infrastructure, data collection and analysis. Our research projects span Internet mapping, performance measurement, security, economics, and policy. Our infrastructure, software development, and data sharing activities support measurement-based internet research, both at CAIDA and around the world, with focus on the health and integrity of the global Internet ecosystem. The executive summary is excerpted below:
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AS Rank v2.1 Released (RESTFUL/Historical/Cone)

Wednesday, May 13th, 2020 by Bradley Huffaker
ASRankv2.1

(GraphQL/RESTFUL)

Responding to feedback from our user community, CAIDA has released version 2.1 of the AS Rank API. This update helps to reduce some of the complexity of the full-featured GraphQL interface through a simplified RESTful API.

AS Rank API version 2.1 adds support for historical queries as well as support for AS Customer Cones, defined as the set of ASes an AS can reach using customer links. You can learn more about AS relationships, customer cones, and how CAIDA sources the data at https://asrank.caida.org/about.

You can find the documentation for AS Rank API version 2.1 here https://api.asrank.caida.org/v2/restful/docs.

You can find documentation detailing how to make use of historical data and customer cones here https://api.asrank.caida.org/v2/docs.

CAIDA Team

CAIDA PhD student receives Microsoft Dissertation Grant for “Inferring Country-Level Transit Influence of Autonomous Systems”

Wednesday, August 7th, 2019 by Alberto Dainotti

CAIDA intern Alex Gamero-Garrido, a PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego, was selected as one of eleven recipients of the 2019 Microsoft Research Dissertation Grants. Each dissertation grant provides funding to doctoral students at North American universities who are underrepresented in the field of computing. This is the third year Microsoft Research has offered these research grants. Microsoft Research scientists with expertise in the students’ topic areas reviewed the more than 200 proposals submitted and identified students pursuing technically excellent and societally impactful research.

Alex Gamero-Garrido’s dissertation, “Inferring Country-Level Transit Influence of Autonomous Systems” may be of interest to networking and cybersecurity researchers, policy makers and operators:

Our work explores the country-level influence exerted by transit providers, a set of networking organizations that often have less direct contact with users, but who are nonetheless responsible for delivering an important fraction of transnational traffic into and out of many countries, and who may have the capability to observe, manipulate, or disrupt some of that traffic. For instance, an accidental misconfiguration or a state-ordered disconnection implemented by one of these operators may render popular services delivered on the Internet (such as email or social media) unreachable in entire regions. These concerns are not abstract, as previous instances of state-ordered disconnections have propagated to other countries and temporarily disabled some of the world’s most popular services there. By studying the ways in which these operators (Autonomous Systems) connect to one another and to the rest of the Internet, we aim to highlight each country’s relative risk exposure.

Congratulations, Alex G!

Originally announced on the Microsoft Research Blog.

CAIDA’s Annual Report for 2018

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019 by kc

The CAIDA annual report summarizes CAIDA’s activities for 2018, in the areas of research, infrastructure, data collection and analysis. Our research projects span Internet topology, routing, security, economics, future Internet architectures, and policy. Our infrastructure, software development, and data sharing activities support measurement-based internet research, both at CAIDA and around the world, with focus on the health and integrity of the global Internet ecosystem. The executive summary is excerpted below:
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9th Workshop on Internet Economics

Tuesday, January 29th, 2019 by kc

On December 12-13, 2018, CAIDA and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) hosted the (invitation-only) 9th interdisciplinary Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE) at the University of California San Diego in La Jolla, CA.

The goal of this workshop series is to provide a forum for researchers, commercial Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to empirically inform emerging Internet regulatory and policy debates.

Presenters were asked to write talk abstracts on their presented topics, addressing four questions:

  1. What is the policy goal or fear you’re addressing?
  2. What data is needed to measure progress toward/away from this goal fear?
  3. What methods do you propose (or are) being used to gather such data?
  4. Who/how should such methods be executed, and the data shared, or not shared?

With a specific focus on measurement challenges, the topics we discussed included: analyzing the evolution of the Internet in a layered-platform context to gain new insights; measurement and analysis of economic impacts of new technologies using old tools; security and trustworthiness, reach (universal service) and reachability, sustainability of investment into public Internet infrastructure, as well as infrastructure to measure the public Internet.

Some of the takeaways from the workshop included:
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CAIDA wins Best Paper at ACM SIGCOMM 2018!

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018 by CAIDA Webmaster

Congratulations to Amogh Dhamdhere, David Clark, Alexander Gamero-Garrido, Matthew Luckie, Ricky K.P. Mok, Gautam Akiwate, Kabir Gogia, Vaibhav Bajpai, Alex Snoeren, and kc claffy, for being awarded Best Paper at SIGCOMM 2018!

The abstract from the paper, “Inferring Persistent Interdomain Congestion“:

There is significant interest in the technical and policy communities regarding the extent,scope, and consumer harm of persistent interdomain congestion. We provide empirical grounding for discussions of interdomain congestion by developing a system and method to measure congestion on thousands of interdomain links without direct access to them. We implement a system based on the Time Series Latency Probes (TSLP) technique that identifies links with evidence of recurring congestion suggestive of an under-provisioned link. We deploy our system at 86 vantage points worldwide and show that congestion inferred using our lightweight TSLP method correlates with other metrics of interconnection performance impairment. We use our method to study interdomain links of eight large U.S. broadband access providers from March 2016 to December 2017, and validate our inferences against ground-truth traffic statistics from two of the providers. For the period of time over which we gathered measurements, we did not find evidence of widespread endemic congestion on interdomain links between access ISPs and directly connected transit and content providers, although some such links exhibited recurring congestion patterns. We describe limitations, open challenges, and a path toward the use of this method for large-scale third-party monitoring of the Internet interconnection ecosystem.

Read the full paper on the CAIDA website.

CAIDA’s Annual Report for 2017

Tuesday, May 29th, 2018 by kc

The CAIDA annual report summarizes CAIDA’s activities for 2017, in the areas of research, infrastructure, data collection and analysis. Our research projects span Internet topology, routing, security, economics, future Internet architectures, and policy. Our infrastructure, software development, and data sharing activities support measurement-based internet research, both at CAIDA and around the world, with focus on the health and integrity of the global Internet ecosystem. The executive summary is excerpted below:
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CAIDA’s 2016 Annual Report

Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 by kc

[Executive summary and link below]

The CAIDA annual report summarizes CAIDA’s activities for 2016, in the areas of research, infrastructure, data collection and analysis. Our research projects span Internet topology, routing, security, economics, future Internet architectures, and policy. Our infrastructure, software development, and data sharing activities support measurement-based internet research, both at CAIDA and around the world, with focus on the health and integrity of the global Internet ecosystem. The executive summary is excerpted below:

Mapping the Internet. We continued to expand our topology mapping capabilities using our Ark measurement infrastructure. We improved the accuracy and sophistication of our topology annotations, including classification of ISPs, business relationships between them, and geographic mapping of interdomain links that implement these relationships. We released two Internet Topology Data Kits (ITDKs) incorporating these advances.

Mapping Interconnection Connectivity and Congestion. We continued our collaboration with MIT to map the rich mesh of interconnection in the Internet in order to study congestion induced by evolving peering and traffic management practices of CDNs and access ISPs. We focused our efforts on the challenge of detecting and localizing congestion to specific points in between networks. We developed new tools to scale measurements to a much wider set of available nodes. We also implemented a new database and graphing platform to allow us to interactively explore our topology and performance measurements. We produced related data collection and analyses to enable evaluation of these measurements in the larger context of the evolving ecosystem: infrastructure resiliency, economic tussles, and public policy.

Monitoring Global Internet Security and Stability. We conducted infrastructure research and development projects that focus on security and stability aspects of the global Internet. We developed continuous fine-grained monitoring capabilities establishing a baseline connectivity awareness against which to interpret observed changes due to network outages or route hijacks. We released (in beta form) a new operational prototype service that monitors the Internet, in near-real-time, and helps identify macroscopic Internet outages affecting the edge of the network.

CAIDA also developed new client tools for measuring IPv4 and IPv6 spoofing capabilities, along with services that provide reporting and allow users to opt-in or out of sharing the data publicly.

Future Internet Architectures. We continued studies of IPv4 and IPv6 paths in the Internet, including topological congruency, stability, and RTT performance. We examined the state of security policies in IPv6 networks, and collaborated to measure CGN deployment in U.S. broadband networks. We also continued our collaboration with researchers at several other universities to advance development of a new Internet architecture: Named Data Networking (NDN) and published a paper on the policy and social implications of an NDN-based Internet.

Public Policy. Acting as an Independent Measurement Expert, we posted our agreed-upon revised methodology for measurement methods and reporting requirements related to AT&T Inc. and DirecTV merger (MB Docket No. 14-90). We published our proposed method and a companion justification document. Inspired by this experience and a range of contradicting claims about interconnection performance, we introduced a new model describing measurements of interconnection links of access providers, and demonstrated how it can guide sound interpretation of interconnection-related measurements regardless of their source.

Infrastructure operations. It was an unprecedented year for CAIDA from an infrastructure development perspective. We continued support for our existing active and passive measurement infrastructure to provide visibility into global Internet behavior, and associated software tools and platforms that facilitate network research and operational assessments.

We made available several data services that have been years in the making: our prototype Internet Outage Detection and Analysis service, with several underlying components released as open source; the Periscope platform to unify and scale querying of thousands of looking glass nodes on the global Internet; our large-scale Internet topology query system (Henya); and our Spoofer system for measurement and analysis of source address validation across the global Internet. Unfortunately, due to continual network upgrades, we lost access to our 10GB backbone traffic monitoring infrastructure. Now we are considering approaches to acquire new monitors capable of packet capture on 100GB links.

As always, we engaged in a variety of tool development, and outreach activities, including maintaining web sites, publishing 13 peer-reviewed papers, 3 technical reports, 4 workshop reports, one (our first) BGP hackathon report, 31 presentations, 20 blog entries, and hosting 6 workshops (including the hackathon). This report summarizes the status of our activities; details about our research are available in papers, presentations, and interactive resources on our web sites. We also provide listings and links to software tools and data sets shared, and statistics reflecting their usage. Finally, we report on web site usage, personnel, and financial information, to provide the public a better idea of what CAIDA is and does.

For the full 2016 annual report, see http://www.caida.org/home/about/annualreports/2016/