Archive for the 'Meetings' Category

NSF WATCH series talk: Mapping Internet Interdomain Congestion

Friday, August 26th, 2016 by kc

Last week I gave a talk at NSF’s 39th Washington Area Trustworthy Computing Hour (WATCH) seminar series on CAIDA’s efforts to map internet interdomain congestion. A recorded webcast of the talk is available.

Abstract:

We used the Ark infrastructure to support an ambitious collaboration with MIT to map the rich mesh of interconnection in the Internet, with a focus on congestion induced by evolving peering and traffic management practices of CDNs and access ISPs, including methods to detect and localize the congestion to specific points in networks. We undertook several studies to pursue two dimensions of this challenge. First, we developed methods and tools to identify interconnection borders, and in some cases their physical locations, from comprehensive Internet topology measurements from many edge vantage points. Then, we developed and deployed scalable performance measurement tools to observe performance at thousands of interconnections, algorithms to mine for evidence of persistent congestion in the resulting data; and a system to visualize the results. We produce other related data collection and analysis to enable evaluation of these measurements in the larger context of the evolving ecosystem: quantifying a given network service providers’ global routing footprint; and business-related classifications of networks. In parallel, we examined the peering ecosystem from an economic perspective, exploring fundamental weaknesses and systemic problems of the currently deployed economic framework of Internet interconnection that will continue to cause peering disputes between ASes.

The slides presented are posted on the CAIDA website: Mapping Internet Interdomain Congestion

1st CAIDA BGP Hackathon brings students and community experts together

Thursday, February 18th, 2016 by Josh Polterock

We set out to conduct a social experiment of sorts, to host a hackathon to hack streaming BGP data. We had no idea we would get such an enthusiastic reaction from the community and that we would reach capacity. We were pleasantly surprised at the response to our invitations when 25 experts came to interact with 50 researchers and practitioners (30 of whom were graduate students). We felt honored to have participants from 15 countries around the world and experts from companies such as Cisco, Comcast, Google, Facebook and NTT, who came to share their knowledge and to help guide and assist our challenge teams.

Having so many domain experts from so many institutions and companies with deep technical understanding of the BGP ecosystem together in one room greatly increased the kinetic potential for what we might accomplish over the course of our two days.

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CAIDA BGP Hackathon 2016 Attendees

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016 by Josh Polterock

We are pleased to post the attendees list for the upcoming CAIDA BGP Hackathon 2016 organized jointly with Colorado State University, University of Southern California, University of Waikato, the Route Views Project, RIPE NCC, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais and FORTH. We look forward to hosting over 80 attendees — including more than 20 domain experts — from over 50 organizations who will come from around the world to participate in the first CAIDA BGP Hackathon at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego in La Jolla, CA. The hackathon is sponsored by industry, professional organizations, and government agencies, with interest in promoting the development of tools to model, measure, and monitor the routing infrastructure of the Internet. This support allowed us to to provide 33 travel grants.

Due to the overwhelming interest in the hackathon, we have reached capacity. We are no longer accepting applications for this year’s hackathon.

We would like to give special thanks to our sponsors.

  • ACM SIGCOMM
  • Cisco
  • Comcast
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Google NetOps and Google Open Source Research Group
  • The Internet Society (ISOC)
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • San Diego Supercomputer Center

Please send any questions or media inquiries regarding the hackathon to bgp-hackathon-info at caida dot org.

Report from the 2nd NDN Community Meeting (NDNcomm 2015)

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015 by kc

The report for the Second NDN Community Meeting (NDNcomm 2015) is available online now. The meeting, held at UCLA in Los Angeles, California on September 28-29, 2015, provided a platform for attendees from 63 institutions across 13 countries to exchange recent NDN research and development results, to debate existing and proposed functionality in NDN forwarding, routing, and security, and to provide feedback to the NDN architecture design evolution.

[The workshop was partially supported by the National Science Foundation CNS-1345286, CNS-1345318, and CNS-1457074. We thank the NDNcomm Program Committee members for their effort of putting together an excellent program. We thank all participants for their insights and feedback at the workshop.]

DHS S&T DDoS Defense PI Meeting

Monday, August 31st, 2015 by kc

Earlier this month, Marina and I went to our first Principal Investigators meeting for a new DHS program on distributed denial of service defense (DDoS Defense), lead by DHS S&T Cybersecurity Division Program Manager Dan Massey. Dan is one of Doug Maughan’s team, and he seems to have picked up Doug’s impressive talent for running effective meetings. I presented these slides on our new spoofer project, a collaboration with Dr. Matthew Luckie, now a senior lecturer at U. Waikato, and Rob Beverly at NPS.

Panel on Cyberwarfare and Cyberattacks at 9th Circuit Judicial Conference

Monday, July 20th, 2015 by kc

I had the honor of contributing to a panel on “Cyberwarfare and cyberattacks: protecting ourselves within existing limitations” at this year’s 9th Circuit Judicial Conference. The panel moderator was Hon. Thomas M. Hardiman, and the other panelists were Professor Peter Cowhey, of UCSD’s School of Global Policy and Strategy, and Professor and Lt. Col. Shane R. Reeves of West Point Academy. Lt. Col. Reeves gave a brief primer on the framework of the Law of Armed Conflict, distinguished an act of cyberwar from a cyberattack, and described the implications for political and legal constraints on governmental and private sector responses. Professor Cowhey followed with a perspective on how economic forces also constrain cybersecurity preparedness and response, drawing comparisons with other industries for which the cost of security technology is perceived to exceed its benefit by those who must invest in its deployment. I used a visualization of an Internet-wide cybersecurity event to illustrate technical, economic, and legal dimensions of the ecosystem that render the fundamental vulnerabilities of today’s Internet infrastructure so persistent and pernicious. A few people said I talked too fast for them to understand all the points I was trying to make, so I thought I should post the notes I used during my panel remarks. (My remarks borrowed heavily from Dan Geer’s two essays: Cybersecurity and National Policy (2010), and his more recent Cybersecurity as Realpolitik (video), both of which I highly recommend.) After explaining the basic concept of a botnet, I showed a video derived from CAIDA’s analysis of a botnet scanning the entire IPv4 address space (discovered and comprehensively analyzed by Alberto Dainotti and Alistair King). I gave a (too) quick rundown of the technological, economic, and legal circumstances of the Internet ecosystem that facilitate the deployment of botnets and other threats to networked critical infrastructure.
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Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2014) Final Report

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015 by kc

The final report for our Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2014) is available for viewing. The abstract:

On December 10-11 2014, we hosted the 4th interdisciplinary Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE) at the UC San Diego’s Supercomputer Center. This workshop series provides a forum for researchers, Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to inform current and emerging regulatory and policy debates. The objective for this year’s workshop was a structured consideration of whether and how policy-makers should try to shape the future of the Internet. To structure the discussion about policy, we began the workshop with a list of potential aspirations for our future telecommunications infrastructure (a list we had previously collated), and asked participants to articulate an aspiration or fear they had about the future of the Internet, which we summarized and discussed on the second day. The focus on aspirations was motivated by the high-level observation that before discussing regulation, we must agree on the objective of the regulation, and why the intended outcome is justified. In parallel, we used a similar format as in previous years: a series of focused sessions, where 3-4 presenters each prepared 10-minute talks on issues in recent regulatory discourse, followed by in-depth discussions. This report highlights the discussions and presents relevant open research questions identified by participants.

See the full workshop report at http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2015/wie2014_report/

Slides from workshop presentations are available at http://www.caida.org/workshops/wie/1412/

Draft white paper that motivated the workshop at:
http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2015/inventory_aspirations_internets_future/

Report from the 1st NDN Community Meeting (NDNcomm)

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015 by kc

The report for the 1st NDN Community Meeting (NDNcomm) is available online now. This report, “The First Named Data Networking Community Meeting (NDNcomm)“, is a brief summary of the first NDN Community Meeting held at UCLA in Los Angeles, California on September 4-5, 2014. The meeting provided a platform for the attendees from 39 institutions across seven countries to exchange their recent NDN research and development results, to debate existing and proposed functionality in security support, and to provide feedback into the NDN architecture design evolution.

The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation CNS-1457074, CNS-1345286, and CNS-1345318. We thank the NDNcomm Program Committee members for their effort of putting together an excellent program. We thank all participants for their insights and feedback at the workshop.

IMAPS Workshop on Internet Measurements and Political Science: Network Outages

Friday, October 10th, 2014 by Josh Polterock

On Wednesday 1 October 2014, CAIDA hosted a small invitation only workshop that brought together researchers working on large-scale Internet outage detection and characterization with researchers from the political sciences with specific expertise in Internet censorship, political violence (including Internet connectivity disruption ordered by authoritarian regimes for censorship), and Internet penetration. Participants viewed and demonstration of and discussed CAIDA’s current data analysis platform for the exploration of historical and realtime Internet measurement data (named “Charthouse”), and possible extensions of the platform to support political science research related to  macroscopic Internet outages.

 A primary use of our current platform is to detect/characterize large-scale Internet outages, i.e., entire regions or countries getting disconnected from the Internet for hours or days. We intend to extend the platform to enable more agile analysis, support larger datasets, improve geographic-based exploration and visualization, based on use case scenarios defined together with political scientists.

The workshop also included experts from the San Diego Supercomputer Center’s Data Enabled Scientific Computing Group, who provided valuable insights into methods for scalable analysis of large data sets requiring high performance computing platforms.  We currently plan to implement part of the Charthouse platform using the Spark/Shark data analytics stack.

presentation at BITAG meeting on internet interdomain congestion

Friday, June 13th, 2014 by kc

I had the honor of being invited to the most recent BITAG (Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group) meeting, to present some recent research (a collaboration with MIT’s CSAIL group) on identifying and analyzing instances of Internet interdomain congestion (an earlier version of which Matthew presented at a NANOG lightning talk in February).

Per their web site, BITAG’s mission is to “bring together engineers and other similar technical experts to develop consensus on broadband network management practices or other related technical issues that can affect users’ Internet experience“. (Their web site also hosts summaries of Silicon Flatirons workshop discussions that inspired the establishment of BITAG.)

It was gratifying to present to such an interested audience, who provided plenty of constructive feedback as well an invitation to join the technical working group (TWG). I look forward to future interactions with BITAG; they seem a potentially potent means of bringing much-needed transparency to increasingly compelling aspects of the Internet ecosystem.