Archive for August, 2019

CAIDA PhD student receives Microsoft Dissertation Grant for “Inferring Country-Level Transit Influence of Autonomous Systems”

Wednesday, August 7th, 2019 by kc

CAIDA intern Alex Gamero-Garrido, a PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego, was selected as one of eleven recipients of the 2019 Microsoft Research Dissertation Grants. Each dissertation grant provides funding to doctoral students at North American universities who are underrepresented in the field of computing. This is the third year Microsoft Research has offered these research grants. Microsoft Research scientists with expertise in the students’ topic areas reviewed the more than 200 proposals submitted and identified students pursuing technically excellent and societally impactful research.

Alex Gamero-Garrido’s dissertation, “Inferring Country-Level Transit Influence of Autonomous Systems” may be of interest to networking and cybersecurity researchers, policy makers and operators:

Our work explores the country-level influence exerted by transit providers, a set of networking organizations that often have less direct contact with users, but who are nonetheless responsible for delivering an important fraction of transnational traffic into and out of many countries, and who may have the capability to observe, manipulate, or disrupt some of that traffic. For instance, an accidental misconfiguration or a state-ordered disconnection implemented by one of these operators may render popular services delivered on the Internet (such as email or social media) unreachable in entire regions. These concerns are not abstract, as previous instances of state-ordered disconnections have propagated to other countries and temporarily disabled some of the world’s most popular services there. By studying the ways in which these operators (Autonomous Systems) connect to one another and to the rest of the Internet, we aim to highlight each country’s relative risk exposure.

Congratulations, Alex G!

Originally announced on the Microsoft Research Blog.