Archive for the 'Economics' Category

CAIDA’s 2015 Annual Report

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016 by kc claffy

[Executive summary and link below]

The CAIDA annual report summarizes CAIDA’s activities for 2015, in the areas of research, infrastructure, data collection and analysis. Our research projects span Internet topology, routing, security, economics, future Internet architectures, and policy. Our infrastructure, software development, and data sharing activities support measurement-based internet research, both at CAIDA and around the world, with focus on the health and integrity of the global Internet ecosystem. The executive summary is excerpted below:

Mapping the Internet. We continued to pursue Internet cartography, improving our IPv4 and IPv6 topology mapping capabilities using our expanding and extensible Ark measurement infrastructure. We improved the accuracy and sophistication of our topology annotation capabilities, including classification of ISPs and their business relationships. Using our evolving IP address alias resolution measurement system, we collected curated, and released another Internet Topology Data Kit (ITDK).

Mapping Interconnection Connectivity and Congestion.
We used the Ark infrastructure to support an ambitious collaboration with MIT to map the rich mesh of interconnection in the Internet, with a focus on congestion induced by evolving peering and traffic management practices of CDNs and access ISPs, including methods to detect and localize the congestion to specific points in networks. We undertook several studies to pursue different dimensions of this challenge: identification of interconnection borders from comprehensive measurements of the global Internet topology; identification of the actual physical location (facility) of an interconnection in specific circumstances; and mapping observed evidence of congestion at points of interconnection. We continued producing other related data collection and analysis to enable evaluation of these measurements in the larger context of the evolving ecosystem: quantifying a given ISP’s global routing footprint; classification of autonomous systems (ASes) according to business type; and mapping ASes to their owning organizations. In parallel, we examined the peering ecosystem from an economic perspective, exploring fundamental weaknesses and systemic problems of the currently deployed economic framework of Internet interconnection that will continue to cause peering disputes between ASes.

Monitoring Global Internet Security and Stability. We conduct other global monitoring projects, which focus on security and stability aspects of the global Internet: traffic interception events (hijacks), macroscopic outages, and network filtering of spoofed packets. Each of these projects leverages the existing Ark infrastructure, but each has also required the development of new measurement and data aggregation and analysis tools and infrastructure, now at various stages of development. We were tremendously excited to finally finish and release BGPstream, a software framework for processing large amounts of historical and live BGP measurement data. BGPstream serves as one of several data analysis components of our outage-detection monitoring infrastructure, a prototype of which was operating at the end of the year. We published four other papers that either use or leverage the results of internet scanning and other unsolicited traffic to infer macroscopic properties of the Internet.

Future Internet Architectures. The current TCP/IP architecture is showing its age, and the slow uptake of its ostensible upgrade, IPv6, has inspired NSF and other research funding agencies around the world to invest in research on entirely new Internet architectures. We continue to help launch this moonshot from several angles — routing, security, testbed, management — while also pursuing and publishing results of six empirical studies of IPv6 deployment and evolution.

Public Policy. Our final research thrust is public policy, an area that expanded in 2015, due to requests from policymakers for empirical research results or guidance to inform industry tussles and telecommunication policies. Most notably, the FCC and AT&T selected CAIDA to be the Independent Measurement Expert in the context of the AT&T/DirecTV merger, which turned out to be as much of a challenge as it was an honor. We also published three position papers each aimed at optimizing different public policy outcomes in the face of a rapidly evolving information and communication technology landscape. We contributed to the development of frameworks for ethical assessment of Internet measurement research methods.

Our infrastructure operations activities also grew this year. We continued to operate active and passive measurement infrastructure with visibility into global Internet behavior, and associated software tools that facilitate network research and security vulnerability analysis. In addition to BGPstream, we expanded our infrastructure activities to include a client-server system for allowing measurement of compliance with BCP38 (ingress filtering best practices) across government, research, and commercial networks, and analysis of resulting data in support of compliance efforts. Our 2014 efforts to expand our data sharing efforts by making older topology and some traffic data sets public have dramatically increased use of our data, reflected in our data sharing statistics. In addition, we were happy to help launch DHS’ new IMPACT data sharing initiative toward the end of the year.

Finally, as always, we engaged in a variety of tool development, and outreach activities, including maintaining web sites, publishing 27 peer-reviewed papers, 3 technical reports, 3 workshop reports, 33 presentations, 14 blog entries, and hosting 5 workshops. This report summarizes the status of our activities; details about our research are available in papers, presentations, and interactive resources on our web sites. We also provide listings and links to software tools and data sets shared, and statistics reflecting their usage. sources. Finally, we offer a “CAIDA in numbers” section: statistics on our performance, financial reporting, and supporting resources, including visiting scholars and students, and all funding sources.

For the full 2015 annual report, see http://www.caida.org/home/about/annualreports/2015/

Comments on Cybersecurity Research and Development Strategic Plan

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015 by kc claffy

An excerpt from a comment that David Clark and I wrote in response to Request for Information (RFI)-Federal Cybersecurity R&D Strategic Plan, posted by the National Science Foundation on 4/27/2015.

The RFI asks “What innovative, transformational technologies have the potential to enhance the security, reliability, resiliency, and trustworthiness of the digital infrastructure, and to protect consumer privacy?

We believe that it would be beneficial to reframe and broaden the scope of this question. The security problems that we face today are not new, and do not persist because of a lack of a technical breakthrough. Rather, they arise in large part in the larger context within which the technology sits, a space defined by misaligned economic incentives that exacerbate coordination problems, lack of clear leadership, regulatory and legal barriers, and the intrinsic complications of a globally connected ecosystem with radically distributed ownership of constituent parts of the infrastructure. Worse, although the public and private sectors have both made enormous investments in cybersecurity technologies over the last decade, we lack relevant data that can characterize the nature and extent of specific cybersecurity problems, or assess the effectiveness of technological or other measures intended to address them.

We first examine two inherently disconnected views of cybersecurity, the correct-operation view and the harm view. These two views do not always align. Attacks on specific components, while disrupting correct operation, may not map to a specific and quantifiable harm. Classes of harms do not always derive from a specific attack on a component; there may be many stages of attack activity that result in harm. Technologists tend to think about assuring correct operation while users, businesses, and policy makers tend to think about preventing classes of harms. Discussions of public policy including research and development funding strategies must bridge this gap.

We then provide two case studies to illustrate our point, and emphasize the importance of developing ways to measure the return on federal investment in cybersecurity R&D.

Full comment:
http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2015/comments_cybersecurity_research_development/

Background on authors: David Clark (MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) has led network architecture and security research efforts for almost 30 years, and has recently turned his attention toward non-technical (including policy) obstacles to progress in cybersecurity through a new effort at MIT funded by the Hewlett Foundation. kc claffy (UC San Diego’s Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA)) leads Internet research and data analysis efforts aimed at informing network science, architecture, security, and public policy. CAIDA is funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity Division, and CAIDA members. This comment reflects the views of its authors and not necessarily the agencies sponsoring their research.

Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2014) Final Report

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015 by kc claffy

The final report for our Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2014) is available for viewing. The abstract:

On December 10-11 2014, we hosted the 4th interdisciplinary Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE) at the UC San Diego’s Supercomputer Center. This workshop series provides a forum for researchers, Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to inform current and emerging regulatory and policy debates. The objective for this year’s workshop was a structured consideration of whether and how policy-makers should try to shape the future of the Internet. To structure the discussion about policy, we began the workshop with a list of potential aspirations for our future telecommunications infrastructure (a list we had previously collated), and asked participants to articulate an aspiration or fear they had about the future of the Internet, which we summarized and discussed on the second day. The focus on aspirations was motivated by the high-level observation that before discussing regulation, we must agree on the objective of the regulation, and why the intended outcome is justified. In parallel, we used a similar format as in previous years: a series of focused sessions, where 3-4 presenters each prepared 10-minute talks on issues in recent regulatory discourse, followed by in-depth discussions. This report highlights the discussions and presents relevant open research questions identified by participants.

See the full workshop report at http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2015/wie2014_report/

Slides from workshop presentations are available at http://www.caida.org/workshops/wie/1412/

Draft white paper that motivated the workshop at:

http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2015/inventory_aspirations_internets_future/

Third Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2012)

Friday, April 19th, 2013 by kc claffy

As part of our NSF-funded network research project on modeling Internet interconnection dynamics, David Clark (MIT) and I hosted the second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2012) last December 12-13. The goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for researchers, commercial Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to empirically inform emerging regulatory and policy debates. The theme for this year’s workshop was “Definitions and Data”. The final report describes the discussions and presents relevant open research questions identified by workshop participants. Slides presented at the workshop are available at the workshop home page. From the intro (but the full report (6-page pdf) is worth reading):
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Correlation between country governance regimes and the reputation of their Internet (IP) address allocations

Monday, April 15th, 2013 by Bradley Huffaker

[While getting our feet wet with D3 (what a wonderful tool!), we finally tried this analysis tidbit that's been on our list for a while.]

We recently analyzed the reputation of a country’s Internet (IPv4) addresses by examining the number of blacklisted IPv4 addresses that geolocate to a given country. We compared this indicator with two qualitative measures of each country’s governance. We hypothesized that countries with more transparent, democratic governmental institutions would harbor a smaller fraction of misbehaving (blacklisted) hosts. The available data confirms this hypothesis. A similar correlation exists between perceived corruption and fraction of blacklisted IP addresses.

For more details of data sources and analysis, see:
http://www.caida.org/research/policy/country-level-ip-reputation/

x:Corruption Perceptions Index
y:IP population %
x:Democracy Index
y:IP population %
x:Democracy Index
y:IP infection %

Interactive graph and analysis on the CAIDA website

2001:deba:7ab1:e::effe:c75

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 by Robert Beverly

[This blog entry is guest written by Robert Beverly at the Naval Postgraduate School.]

In many respects, the deployment, adoption, use, and performance of IPv6 has received more recent attention than IPv4. Certainly the longitudinal measurement of IPv6, from its infancy to the exhaustion of ICANN v4 space to native 1% penetration (as observed by Google), is more complete than IPv4. Indeed, there are many vested parties in (either the success or failure) of IPv6, and numerous IPv6 measurement efforts afoot.

Researchers from Akamai, CAIDA, ICSI, NPS, and MIT met in early January, 2013 to firstly share and make sense of current measurement initiatives, while secondly plotting a path forward for the community in measuring IPv6. A specific objective of the meeting was to understand which aspects of IPv6 measurement are “done” (in the sense that there exists a sound methodology, even if measurement should continue), and which IPv6 questions/measurements remain open research problems. The meeting agenda and presentation slides are archived online.

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Targeted Serendipity: the Search for Storage

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012 by Josh Polterock

On the heels of our recent press release regarding fresh publications that  make use of the UCSD Network Telescope data, we would like to take a moment to thank the institutions that have helped preserve this data over the last eight years. Though we recently received an NSF award to enable  near-real-time sharing of this data as well as improved classification, the award does not cover the cost to maintain this historic archive. At current UCSD rates, the 104.66 TiB would cost us approximately $40,000 per year to store. This does not take into account the metadata we have collected which adds roughly 20 TB to the original data.  As a result, we had spent the last several months indexing this data in preparation for deleting it forever.

Then, last month, I had the opportunity to attend the Security at the Cyberborder Workshop in Indianapolis. This workshop focused on how the NSF-funded IRNC networks might (1) capture and articulate technical and policy cybersecurity considerations related to international research network connections, and (2) capture opportunities and challenges for the those connections to foster cybersecurity research.  I did not expect to find a new benefactor for storage of our telescope data at the workshop though, in fact, I did.

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Second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2011)

Monday, March 5th, 2012 by kc claffy

As part of our NSF-funded network research project on modeling Internet interconnection dynamics, we hosted the second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2011) last December 1-2. The goal of the workshop was to bring together network technology and policy researchers with providers of commercial Internet facilities and services (network operators) to further explore the common objective of framing an agenda for the emerging but empirically stunted field of Internet infrastructure economics. The final report (http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2012/wie11_report/) attempts to capture the content, structure, and depth of the discussions, and presents relevant open research questions identified by workshop participants. From the intro (but the 5-page pdf is worth reading):
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att/t-mobile and icann share economic consultants

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011 by kc claffy

The last line of this FCC announcement is ominous enough:

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network neutrality: the meme, its cost, its future.

Friday, August 26th, 2011 by kc claffy

Policy making has become predominated by sponsored research, politics, campaign contributions and rhetoric. In light of an apparent disinterest for the facts it comes as no surprise that the network neutrality debate highlights opposing perceptions about the impact from changes in the next generation Internet. Regrettably no unbiased fact finding appears readily available, because politicization at the FCC prevents fair minded assessment by the Democratic and Republican Commissioners and heretofore the conflict has not generated a question of law or fact reviewable by a court.
— Rob Frieden: Internet 3.0: Identifying Problems and Solutions to the Network Neutrality Debate, 2007
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in June I participated on a panel on network neutrality hosted at the June cybersecurity meeting of the DHS/SRI Infosec Technology Transition Council (ITTC), where “experts and leaders from the government, private, financial, IT, venture capitalist, and academia and science sectors come together to address the problem of identity theft and related criminal activity on the Internet.” Here is a belated recap of my thoughts on that panel, including what network neutrality has to do with cybersecurity.

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