Archive for the 'Economics' Category

Third Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2012)

Friday, April 19th, 2013 by kc

As part of our NSF-funded network research project on modeling Internet interconnection dynamics, David Clark (MIT) and I hosted the second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2012) last December 12-13. The goal of the workshop was to provide a forum for researchers, commercial Internet facilities and service providers, technologists, economists, theorists, policy makers, and other stakeholders to empirically inform emerging regulatory and policy debates. The theme for this year’s workshop was “Definitions and Data”. The final report describes the discussions and presents relevant open research questions identified by workshop participants. Slides presented at the workshop are available at the workshop home page. From the intro (but the full report (6-page pdf) is worth reading):
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Correlation between country governance regimes and the reputation of their Internet (IP) address allocations

Monday, April 15th, 2013 by bradley

[While getting our feet wet with D3 (what a wonderful tool!), we finally tried this analysis tidbit that's been on our list for a while.]

We recently analyzed the reputation of a country’s Internet (IPv4) addresses by examining the number of blacklisted IPv4 addresses that geolocate to a given country. We compared this indicator with two qualitative measures of each country’s governance. We hypothesized that countries with more transparent, democratic governmental institutions would harbor a smaller fraction of misbehaving (blacklisted) hosts. The available data confirms this hypothesis. A similar correlation exists between perceived corruption and fraction of blacklisted IP addresses.

For more details of data sources and analysis, see:
http://www.caida.org/research/policy/country-level-ip-reputation/

x:Corruption Perceptions Index
y:IP population %
x:Democracy Index
y:IP population %
x:Democracy Index
y:IP infection %

Interactive graph and analysis on the CAIDA website

2001:deba:7ab1:e::effe:c75

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 by rob

[This blog entry is guest written by Robert Beverly at the Naval Postgraduate School.]

In many respects, the deployment, adoption, use, and performance of IPv6 has received more recent attention than IPv4. Certainly the longitudinal measurement of IPv6, from its infancy to the exhaustion of ICANN v4 space to native 1% penetration (as observed by Google), is more complete than IPv4. Indeed, there are many vested parties in (either the success or failure) of IPv6, and numerous IPv6 measurement efforts afoot.

Researchers from Akamai, CAIDA, ICSI, NPS, and MIT met in early January, 2013 to firstly share and make sense of current measurement initiatives, while secondly plotting a path forward for the community in measuring IPv6. A specific objective of the meeting was to understand which aspects of IPv6 measurement are “done” (in the sense that there exists a sound methodology, even if measurement should continue), and which IPv6 questions/measurements remain open research problems. The meeting agenda and presentation slides are archived online.

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Targeted Serendipity: the Search for Storage

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012 by josh

On the heels of our recent press release regarding fresh publications that  make use of the UCSD Network Telescope data, we would like to take a moment to thank the institutions that have helped preserve this data over the last eight years. Though we recently received an NSF award to enable  near-real-time sharing of this data as well as improved classification, the award does not cover the cost to maintain this historic archive. At current UCSD rates, the 104.66 TiB would cost us approximately $40,000 per year to store. This does not take into account the metadata we have collected which adds roughly 20 TB to the original data.  As a result, we had spent the last several months indexing this data in preparation for deleting it forever.

Then, last month, I had the opportunity to attend the Security at the Cyberborder Workshop in Indianapolis. This workshop focused on how the NSF-funded IRNC networks might (1) capture and articulate technical and policy cybersecurity considerations related to international research network connections, and (2) capture opportunities and challenges for the those connections to foster cybersecurity research.  I did not expect to find a new benefactor for storage of our telescope data at the workshop though, in fact, I did.

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Second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2011)

Monday, March 5th, 2012 by kc

As part of our NSF-funded network research project on modeling Internet interconnection dynamics, we hosted the second Workshop on Internet Economics (WIE2011) last December 1-2. The goal of the workshop was to bring together network technology and policy researchers with providers of commercial Internet facilities and services (network operators) to further explore the common objective of framing an agenda for the emerging but empirically stunted field of Internet infrastructure economics. The final report (http://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2012/wie11_report/) attempts to capture the content, structure, and depth of the discussions, and presents relevant open research questions identified by workshop participants. From the intro (but the 5-page pdf is worth reading):
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att/t-mobile and icann share economic consultants

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011 by kc

The last line of this FCC announcement is ominous enough:

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network neutrality: the meme, its cost, its future.

Friday, August 26th, 2011 by kc

Policy making has become predominated by sponsored research, politics, campaign contributions and rhetoric. In light of an apparent disinterest for the facts it comes as no surprise that the network neutrality debate highlights opposing perceptions about the impact from changes in the next generation Internet. Regrettably no unbiased fact finding appears readily available, because politicization at the FCC prevents fair minded assessment by the Democratic and Republican Commissioners and heretofore the conflict has not generated a question of law or fact reviewable by a court.
— Rob Frieden: Internet 3.0: Identifying Problems and Solutions to the Network Neutrality Debate, 2007
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in June I participated on a panel on network neutrality hosted at the June cybersecurity meeting of the DHS/SRI Infosec Technology Transition Council (ITTC), where “experts and leaders from the government, private, financial, IT, venture capitalist, and academia and science sectors come together to address the problem of identity theft and related criminal activity on the Internet.” Here is a belated recap of my thoughts on that panel, including what network neutrality has to do with cybersecurity.

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Underneath the Hood: Ownership vs. Stewardship of the Internet

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011 by kc

[I posted the following on CircleID today:]

As is well known to most CircleID readers — but importantly, not to most other Internet users — in March 2011, ICANN knowingly and purposefully embraced an unprecedented policy that will encourage filtering, blocking, and/or redirecting entire virtual neighborhoods, i.e., “top-level domains” (TLDs). Specifically, ICANN approved the creation of the “.XXX” suffix, intended for pornography websites. Although the owner of the new .XXX TLD deems a designated virtual enclave for morally controversial material to be socially beneficial for the Internet, this claim obfuscates the dangers such a policy creates under the hood.

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in response to NTIA on IANA functions

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011 by kc

In response to the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s recent Further Notice of Inquiry on the Internet Assigned Names and Numbers Authority (IANA) Functions [Docket No. 110207099-1319-0], I submitted the following comment:

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my third FCC TAC meeting — the most exciting yet

Monday, July 25th, 2011 by kc

My third FCC Technical Advisory Council meeting (3-hr. video archive here) was the most exciting yet. The TAC’s Critical Legacy Transition working group, studying the legacy public switched telephone network, recommended that the Council advise the FCC to set a concrete date to sunset (shut down) the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). (!) The working group recommended the year 2018 as a starting point for lively discussion.

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